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What your clothing says about you according to fashion psychology

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You don’t have to be a fashionista or a London Fashion Week regular to understand how essential our clothing style is to our reputations in the twenty-first century. Our clothes send powerful signals to our peers and strangers, projecting the self-image we want to project.

However, how many of us truly understand the psychology of how people on the street or at work interpret our clothing choices, and how this impression may differ from the one we believe we’re conveying to them?

Several psychological surveys have revealed the true impact of clothing choices on how we perceive and judge one another, with some surprising results. They even show how subtle differences in clothing can affect our ability to attract a partner while dating. Whether you’re into, cross-dressing or traditional, here we’ll cover some really important points.

Contrary to popular belief

Despite the gender stereotype of females being more fashion-conscious and mindful of others’ clothing and cosmetics efforts than guys, research has revealed men’s clothing concerns.

Contrary to popular assumption, men are typically more self-conscious than women about their clothing choices and how they are seen in public.

As a result, regardless of our gender, we must comprehend the significance of wardrobe selections. Whether you are male or female, your fashion choices may have an impact on your self-image, the impression you give others, and how people react to you. They may have an impact on anything from the outcome of a sporting event to the impression an interviewer has of your capacity to perform well in a work position.

This article examines the impact that our current fashion choices have on our lives, as well as how people around us perceive our unconscious clothing decisions.

What your wardrobe says about you: Why does clothing matter?

Clothes have not always been as effective at revealing our personalities as they are today. Fashion choices have only grown relevant as a result of technical improvements throughout the millennia.

Whereas in earlier civilizations, the primary function of clothing was to keep us warm and relatively dry, central heating warms our homes today, reducing our reliance on clothing alone to help us survive. Clothes have evolved from a practical asset to a social marker, influencing how we perceive ourselves. They help us to be seen in the light we want to be seen in, as well as exude our personalities and social status.

Dress sense represents personal affluence and style in many countries. Economist George Taylor, for example, highlighted this most eloquently with the Hemline Index (Taylor, 1926). Taylor observed that when a country enters a recession and adopts austerity spending habits, women frequently favor longer dresses, but hemlines often get shorter during times of prosperity.

A second major effect on our fashion sense is the product of millions of years of evolution as a species. The notion of mate selection in evolutionary psychology proposes that, like many animals, human behavior is influenced by our efforts to find a partner and reproduce.

Animal signaling: ‘honest signals,’ like this male peacock exposing his brilliant covert feathers to attract a female companion.

A male peacock would expose his brilliant fan of covert feathers in a ceremony to attract a female with whom to mate, according to signaling theory. Such rituals differ amongst animals, but in humans, our capacity to produce and wear clothes provides us with an analogous advantage in being able to differentiate ourselves from a crowd and display our individuality to attract a partner. Alternatively, we may utilize clothes to blend into a crowd and conceal our uniqueness by wearing a uniform.

Are you dressed to impress?

Aside from the cliche “dress to impress,” what do we know about the psychology of dating outfit choices?

To begin, evaluate how we intend to ‘impress’ potential partners. Research conducted at the University of Nebraska by Joseph Benz examined more than 90 men and women about how they misled potential mates on dates. The study discovered that both genders utilize deceit when dating, but for different reasons.

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