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The Non-Surgical Options For Treating Heart Blockage

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The onset of a blocked artery in the heart is always a cause for serious concern, and immediate medical attention is required. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary; however, non-surgical techniques can relieve and prevent further deterioration. This blog will discuss the different non-surgical options for treating heart blockage.

An Overview of Heart Blockage

Heart blockage, also known as coronary artery disease, occurs when plaque builds up in the arteries that transfer blood to your heart. The buildup of plaque can narrow your arteries and reduce the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your heart muscle. This can cause chest pain (angina), shortness of breath, dizziness, or an irregular heartbeat. In extreme cases, it can even lead to a heart attack.

Fortunately, there are treatments for this condition, such as angioplasty and bypass surgery. Other heart blockage treatment include lifestyle changes like exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet, and taking certain medications like statins or ACE inhibitors. To get your diagnosis done, it is better to consider Max healthcare hospital.

 Non-Surgical Treatment Options for Treating Heart Blockage

 The major non-surgical treatment options for heart blockage include:

  1. Lifestyle Changes: Making lifestyle changes like quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, eating a healthy diet, and exercising regularly can help manage heart blockages and improve overall health.

2. Medications: Medications such as beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins can be prescribed to reduce the risk of blockages in the arteries by controlling blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

3. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI): PCI is used to open blocked or narrowed coronary arteries without surgery. A thin tube called a catheter is inserted into an artery and threaded through the bloodstream until it reaches the blocked artery. A balloon at the end of the catheter is inflated to open the artery, and a stent is inserted to help keep it open.

4. Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG): CABG is an open-heart surgical procedure used to redirect blood flow around blocked arteries using a graft taken from another part of the body, such as the chest or leg. It is one of the most effective treatments for severe blockages in the heart.

5. Angioplasty: Angioplasty is a type of PCI (Percutaneous Coronary Intervention) used to open blocked or narrowed arteries. A balloon at the end of a catheter is inserted into an artery and inflated to widen the artery, while a stent is inserted to help keep it open. This procedure is usually done with a local anaesthetic and can be performed in the hospital or outpatient centre. Angioplasty is minimally invasive and has fewer risks than surgery. However, it may be less effective for people with severely blocked arteries.

6. Atherectomy: Atherectomy is another type of PCI used to treat narrowed or blocked arteries. It involves using a catheter tipped with a surgical blade to remove plaque from the artery wall to restore normal blood flow. This procedure can also be performed in the hospital or outpatient centre and requires only a local anaesthetic. The recovery time for an atherectomy is faster than for angioplasty, keeping in mind risks including damage to the artery wall and an increased risk of bleeding.

7. Stent Placement: A stent is a tiny tube made of metal mesh inserted into the artery to keep it open after an angioplasty procedure. This prevents the artery from narrowing again and increases blood flow. The placement of a stent requires only local anaesthetic. Still, there is a greater risk of complications than with angioplasty alone, including damage to arteries or blood vessels and blockage due to scarring.

These are all non-surgical options for treating heart blockage that can help manage symptoms and reduce the risk of future problems. However, these treatments can not cure the underlying cause of the blockage and should be discussed with your doctor before proceeding. Speak to a qualified medical professional to determine which treatment option is right for you.

The Bottom Line

Treating blocked arteries in the heart is a serious medical matter that requires careful consideration. Non-surgical heart blockage treatments may benefit some patients depending on the severity of their condition. Talking with your doctor to determine which option is right for you is important.

Treating blocked arteries can help improve quality of life and reduce the risk of blockage complications, such as stroke or heart attack. With proper care and management, it is possible to make wise decisions in improving cardiovascular health and preventing further damage.

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