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History Of Ayyubi Empire

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The Ayyubid dynasty (Arabic: الأيوبي‎ al-Ayyūbī) was a Sunni Muslim dynasty of Kurdish origin, founded by Saladin and centered in Egypt. The dynasty ruled much of the Middle East during the 12th and 13th centuries CE. The Ayyubids established Cairo as their capital in 1169, and under Saladin built an empire that included Egypt, Syria, Mesopotamia, Hejaz, Yemen and other parts of North Africa.

They ruled over an area stretching from the Hindu Kush to modern-day Burkina Faso in West Africa. The dynasty came to an end in 1341 with the death of As-Salih Ayyub; its last ruler was An-Nasir Hasan.

The Ayyubi Empire was a Muslim dynasty that ruled much of the Middle East from 1171-1250. The empire was founded by Saladin, who rose to power after leading the Muslim armies to victory against the Christian Crusaders in the Battle of Hattin in 1187. Saladin’s successors expanded the empire further, conquering Egypt and Syria and making Cairo their capital.

At its height, the Ayyubi Empire included parts of modern-day Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Palestine. The Ayyubis were known for their military prowess and their religious tolerance; under their rule, Muslims, Christians, and Jews lived relatively peacefully side-by-side. However, the empire eventually fell to Mongol invasions from the east.

Today, the legacy of the Ayyubi Empire lives on in the form of Islamic architecture and art that can still be seen throughout the Middle East.

How Did the Ayyubid Empire Begin And End?

The Ayyubid empire was founded by Saladin, who took control of Egypt in 1169. He quickly expanded his territory into Syria and Palestine, defeating the Crusaders and establishing an Islamic state. The Ayyubid dynasty ended with the death of Saladin’s son, al-Afdal, in 1250.

The Mamluks, who had served as Saladin’s bodyguards, seized power and established their own dynasty.

Who Started the Ayyubid Empire?

The Ayyubid empire was started by Saladin, who was the first sultan of Egypt and Syria. He was born in Tikrit, Iraq in 1138. His real name was Yusuf ibn Ayyub, but he is better known by his honorific title of Salah ad-Din or “Righteousness of the Faith.”

He rose to power in 1169 when he seized control of Egypt from the ruling Fatimid Caliphate. Under his rule, the Ayyubid dynasty extended its territory to include parts of North Africa, Arabia, and even Spain and Portugal. Saladin died in 1193, but his legacy as a great military leader and defender of Islam lives on.

When Did the Ayyubid Empire Begin And End?

The Ayyubid empire was founded in 1171 by Saladin, who led the Muslim forces in the successful campaign against the Crusaders. The Ayyubids ruled over Egypt, Syria, Mesopotamia and Yemen until 1250. Under their rule, the Islamic world experienced a period of prosperity and cultural advancement.

The Ayyubids were succeeded by the Mamluk dynasty.

Who Destroyed Ayyubid?

The Ayyubid dynasty was founded in 1169 by Saladin, a Kurdish general who rose to power after leading the Muslim military forces in the successful campaign against the Crusader states in the Levant. The Ayyubid dynasty ruled over Egypt, Syria, Yemen and parts of Mesopotamia and North Africa from its capital Cairo. The dynasty came to an end in 1250 with the death of its last ruler, As-Salih Ayyub.

The Mamluk Sultanate was founded in 1250 by Mamluk generals who deposed and killed As-Salih Ayyub, the last ruler of the Ayyubid dynasty. The Mamluks took control of Egypt and established their own sultanate which lasted until 1517 when it was conquered by the Ottoman Empire.

Ayyubid Dynasty Family Tree

The Ayyubid dynasty was founded by Saladin, who became the first sultan of Egypt and Syria after defeating the Fatimid Caliphate in 1171. The dynasty lasted until 1250, when it was overthrown by the Mamluk Sultanate. The Ayyubids were of Kurdish descent, and their name comes from Ayyub ibn Shadad, an ancestor of Saladin.

The most famous ayubbids include: Saladin: He was the founder of the dynasty, and is best known for leading Islamic forces in the Third Crusade against Christian forces in Palestine. He recaptured Jerusalem from Crusaders in 1187, and is considered a national hero in modern-day Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt.

Shajar al-Durr: She was Saladin’s wife and briefly ruled as Sultana after his death before being overthrown by her stepson Al-Malik al-Nasir. Al-Aziz Uthman: He was Saladin’s son and succeeded him as Sultan after his death. He expanded his father’s empire to include North Africa and Yemen.

Al-Malik al-Nasir: He was Saladin’s grandson and succeeded Al-Aziz Uthman as Sultan. He expanded the empire even further, but lost much of it to Mongol invasions during his reign.

Who Defeated Ayyubid Dynasty

The Ayyubid dynasty was a Muslim dynasty of Kurdish origin founded by Saladin and centered in Egypt. The dynasty ruled much of the Middle East during the 12th and 13th centuries. Though it temporarily lost control of Syria and Palestine to the Crusaders after Saladin’s death, it regained these territories within a few years and continued to expand its empire until its downfall at the hands of the Mamluks in 1250.

List of Ayyubid Sultans

The Ayyubid dynasty was a Muslim dynasty of Kurdish origin, founded by Saladin and centered in Egypt. The dynasty ruled much of the Middle East during the 12th and 13th centuries CE. The Ayyubids succeeded the Fatimid Caliphate in Egypt and attempted to expand their power into Syria, but were eventually defeated by the Mamluks.

Saladin, the founder of the Ayyubid dynasty, was born in Tikrit, Iraq in 1137 CE. He rose to prominence as a general during the Muslim conquests of Syria and Egypt. In 1169 CE, Saladin seized control of Egypt from the Fatimids and proclaimed himself Sultan.

He quickly began expanding his territory into Syria, but faced stiff opposition from the Crusader states and other Muslim dynasties. Nevertheless, by 1193 CE he had succeeded in uniting most of Syria under his rule. During his reign, Saladin gained a reputation for being a generous and just ruler.

He is also credited with stopping the Crusades in their tracks; after defeating King Baldwin IV at the Battle of Hattin in 1187 CE, he recaptured Jerusalem from Christian control and ended Latin rule over the city (although Muslims were not allowed to enter). Following Saladin’s death in 1193 CE, his sons al-Afdal (ruled 1193-1203 CE) and al-Aziz Uthman (ruled 1203-1218 CE) took over as rulers of Egypt and Syria respectively; however, they were unable to hold on to their father’s gains and both territories soon fell back into Mamluk hands. The last Ayyubid sultan was An-Nasir Yusuf (ruled 1293-1294 CE), who unsuccessfully tried to wrest control of Syria away from the Mamluks before being captured and executed by them.

How Did the Ayyubid Dynasty Fall

The Ayyubid dynasty was founded by Saladin in 1169 and lasted until 1250. The dynasty ended with the death of Saladin’s son, al-Afdal. There are several reasons for the fall of the Ayyubid dynasty.

One reason is that after Saladin’s death, there was no strong leader to take his place. Another reason is that the Ayyubids were constantly fighting among themselves and against other dynasties such as the Crusaders and Mamluks. Lastly, many of the Ayyubid rulers were not very competent or effective leaders.

As a result, their kingdom slowly crumbled from within and eventually came to an end.

Ayyubid Empire Area

The Ayyubid Empire was a Muslim dynasty that ruled over much of the Middle East from 1169 to 1250. The empire reached its zenith under Saladin, who conquered Egypt, Syria, and North Africa from the Crusaders. At its height, the Ayyubid Empire included parts of modern-day Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Arabia, and Israel.

Under Saladin’s successors, the empire declined in power and was eventually eclipsed by the Mamluk Sultanate. However, the legacy of the Ayyubid Dynasty lived on through its art and architecture; many buildings erected during this period can still be seen today in Cairo and other cities across the Middle East.

Ayyubid Dynasty Vs Ottoman Empire

The Ayyubid dynasty was founded by Saladin in 1169 and lasted until 1260. The Ottoman Empire was founded by Osman I in 1299 and lasted until 1922. Both empires were located in the Middle East.

The Ayyubid dynasty was named after Saladin, who was of Kurdish descent. The Ottoman Empire was named after Osman I, who was of Turkish descent. Both dynasties were Muslim, but the Ayyubids were Sunni while the Ottomans were Shia.

The Ayyubids focused on conquering Egypt, Syria, and Palestine while the Ottomans focused on conquering Anatolia and the Balkans. The Ayyubids did not have a strong navy while the Ottomans had a strong navy which helped them expand their empire. TheAybubs are considered to be one of the greatest Muslim dynasties while the Ottomans are considered to be one of the greatest empires in history.

Conclusion

The Ayyubid dynasty was founded by Saladin, who ruled Egypt from 1169–1193. After Saladin’s death, his sons al-Afdal and al-Aziz inherited the empire. Al-Afdal ruled from 1193–1203, while al-Aziz ruled from 1203–1218.

The Ayyubids reached their height under the reign of al-Malik al-Kamil, who ruled from 1218–1238. The dynasty declined after his death, culminating in the Mamluk conquest of Egypt in 1250. The Ayyubid dynasty was founded by Saladin in 1169, who became the first sultan of Egypt and Syria after defeating the Fatimid Caliphate.

He expanded the empire to include parts of North Africa, Yemen, and Arabia. After Saladin’s death in 1193, his sons al-Afdal and al-Aziz inherited the empire. Al-Afdal ruling from 1193 to 1203 focused on consolidating power within Egypt while maintaining good relations with other Muslim states; he successfully repelled a Crusader invasion in 1197.

Al-Aziz succeeded him and extended Ayyubid rule to Palestine and Syria; he also faced invasions from crusaders and Mongols during his reign. The Ayyubids reached their height under Malik al-Kamil, who became sultan in 1218; during Kamil’s reign Egyptian culture flourished and trade increased significantly. The Mamluks were military slaves originally brought to Cairo by Kamil to help fight against Crusaders and Mongols; they eventually overthrew Kamil’s successor as sultan (al-Salih Ayyub) in 1250, ending ayubbaid rule over Egypt.

thanks:dailytimezone

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